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Correction To Friday's Rocky Mountain Oyster Story

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Correction To Friday's Rocky Mountain Oyster Story

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Correction To Friday's Rocky Mountain Oyster Story

Correction To Friday's Rocky Mountain Oyster Story

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On Morning Edition last Friday, we mentioned that Rocky Mountain oysters come from cows. Listeners wrote in to say that's not true.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Steve, I know I'm not hosting today but can I interrupt with a correction.

INSKEEP: David Greene is here. David, go ahead.

GREENE: So last Friday, I mentioned on air that Rocky Mountain oysters come from cows. Well, our listeners noted that's not technically true. Cows are female bovines, the kind you might get milk from. They're not the source of Rocky Mountain oysters. Oysters have to come from a male calf - which, after he's donated his oysters, becomes a steer.

INSKEEP: Thanks, David. Striving never to steer you wrong on the program that never has a cow.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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