NPR logo

Police Post Selfie Online, Suspect Turns Himelf In

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/271873756/271873757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Police Post Selfie Online, Suspect Turns Himelf In

Around the Nation

Police Post Selfie Online, Suspect Turns Himelf In

Police Post Selfie Online, Suspect Turns Himelf In

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/271873756/271873757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Palm Beach County, Fla., someone stole a cell phone. Investigators used the phone's photo sharing settings to access its pictures and discovered the alleged thief had taken a shot of himself.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne, asking you to consider all the hours police have spent taking mug shots of criminal suspects, when really these days a criminal can just take a selfie. In Palm Beach County, Florida, someone stole a cell phone. Investigators used the phone's photo sharing settings to access its pictures and discovered that the alleged thief had taken a shot of himself. He turned himself in after police posted the photo online. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.