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Petitioners Want To Ban Cheap Pizza

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Petitioners Want To Ban Cheap Pizza

Business

Petitioners Want To Ban Cheap Pizza

Petitioners Want To Ban Cheap Pizza

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The $1 slice of pizza has been a tradition in New York City for many years. A petition on Change.org wants to ban $1 pizza on New York's Lower East Side. It is labeled as an effort to promote "food diversity."

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our Last Word In Business is an update on the campaign against the scourge of cheap food. This really is a problem in the minds of small-business people. Think about how giant stores have crowded out local retailers.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

But in this case, the giant food is local. It's the $1 slice of pizza, which has been a tradition in New York City for many, many, many years.

MONTAGNE: Now, a petition on Change.org is calling to ban $1 pizza on New York's Lower East Side. It's labeled as an effort to promote food diversity.

INSKEEP: These anti-cheap-slice activists say cheap pizza crowds out other midprice options. As of this morning, the petition had only 27 signatures.

MONTAGNE: Maybe they'd get more signatures if they threw in a free slice of pizza. What do you think, Steve?

INSKEEP: Might work.

MONTAGNE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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