NPR logo

Moviefone To Go Silent, App Will Continue

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/281916707/281916708" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Moviefone To Go Silent, App Will Continue

Business

Moviefone To Go Silent, App Will Continue

Moviefone To Go Silent, App Will Continue

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/281916707/281916708" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

To find out movie listings, all you needed to do was call 777-FILM. Because calls have dropped off, the automated phone service will be discontinued. The app will still show movie listings.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NR business news starts with good-bye movie phone.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: 777-FILM was a popular phone number in the mid-90s. It's how savvy moviegoers found out when and where their choice of movie was playing. Dial the number and hello, welcome to movie phone. The phone service was bought by AOL in 1999 for a whopping $388 million. Since then, callers have dropped from about three million down to just thousands, according to The New York Times. Now AOL is warning callers that the line will soon go silent, though the movie phone app will still be available.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.