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2 San Francisco Bars Ban Google Glass

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2 San Francisco Bars Ban Google Glass

Business

2 San Francisco Bars Ban Google Glass

2 San Francisco Bars Ban Google Glass

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The ban on Google's wearable computer is meant to preserve the privacy of other customers, who may worry about sneaky recordings. Plus, the new technology is already a prime target for thieves.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business is: bars ban glasses.

Patrons at two San Francisco watering holes will have to heed a new rule before they go bellying up to the bar, no Google Glass allowed. Their ban on Google's wearable computer is meant to preserve the privacy of other customers who may worry about sneaky recordings.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The bar's owners also say they want to protect the lucky few Google Glass owners. These devices have already become a prime target for thieves. Maybe this is a step toward making bars what they should be, places to focus on your friends and fellow patrons, or a ballgame or a good book. That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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