The Scientist Who Makes Stars On Earth

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The Z machine is located in Albuquerque, N.M., and is part of the Pulsed Power Program, which started at Sandia National i

The Z machine is located in Albuquerque, N.M., and is part of the Pulsed Power Program, which started at Sandia National Randy Montoya/Sandia National Laboratory hide caption

itoggle caption Randy Montoya/Sandia National Laboratory
The Z machine is located in Albuquerque, N.M., and is part of the Pulsed Power Program, which started at Sandia National

The Z machine is located in Albuquerque, N.M., and is part of the Pulsed Power Program, which started at Sandia National

Randy Montoya/Sandia National Laboratory

An astrophysicist is using something called the Z machine at Sandia National Lab to recreate the conditions on a white dwarf star — only for a few nanoseconds, but still, enough to study.

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