Friendly Reminder: Clocks Spring Ahead On Sunday

Daylight Saving Time returns on Sunday morning. It's time to consider what you'll do with your extra hour of daylight.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And get your clocks ready. Daylight Saving Time is back. The clocks go forward Sunday morning, meaning you lose an hour of sleep, but gain an hour of sunlight at the other end of the day. One hour, I mean, it seems like not such a big deal.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Or maybe it is. Peter Tsai is an IT specialist at the Technic working company Spiceworks. He calculated quite a few things that happened in one hour around the world. Based on statistics from last year, Tsai found that an average of six billion emails are sent per hour. No wonder we can't get ahead of it.

GREENE: Yeah, really. Lots of money is made every hour, also, around the globe. Tsai says food services companies make about $113 million.

WERTHEIMER: Movies make $187 million.

GREENE: And Tsai's industry, information technology, nearly $434 million.

WERTHEIMER: So, sit down and consider what you'll do with your extra hour of daylight. Maybe you have a beer and think about it. You'll be in good company. Americans spend more than $9 million on beer per hour.

GREENE: I like that idea.

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