Fresh Air Weekend: 'Blood Will Out,' An Opera Powerhouse And A Reading

When hitting a high note, mezzo-soprano Dolora Zajick says, "You have to have support. You have to have resonance. People have to understand what you're saying." i i

When hitting a high note, mezzo-soprano Dolora Zajick says, "You have to have support. You have to have resonance. People have to understand what you're saying." David Sauer/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption David Sauer/Courtesy of the artist
When hitting a high note, mezzo-soprano Dolora Zajick says, "You have to have support. You have to have resonance. People have to understand what you're saying."

When hitting a high note, mezzo-soprano Dolora Zajick says, "You have to have support. You have to have resonance. People have to understand what you're saying."

David Sauer/Courtesy of the artist

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

'Blood Will Out' Reveals Secrets Of A Murderous Master Manipulator: Author Walter Kirn thought he was befriending an eccentric Rockefeller, but his pal turned out to be an impostor wanted for murder. Kirn's new book explores the depths of that deception.

A Poetry Reading: 'To My Oldest Friend, Whose Silence Is Like A Death': Fresh Air's classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz recently published a poem about friendship and loss on Poets.org.

For Opera Powerhouse Dolora Zajick, 'Singing Is Connected To The Body': The mezzo-soprano discovered opera as a 22-year-old pre-med student. She took "a crack at a singing career" and has been at the Metropolitan Opera for 25 years. Now she's helping emerging singers.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

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