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Sarah Connor's Legacy An Inspiration For Single Moms

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Sarah Connor's Legacy An Inspiration For Single Moms

Sarah Connor's Legacy An Inspiration For Single Moms

Sarah Connor's Legacy An Inspiration For Single Moms

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/292474677/292986724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

This week, Watson tells host Arun Rath how 30 years ago, The Terminator introduced us to Sarah Connor, who during the history of the franchise broke new ground in Hollywood's depiction of single moms. They also discuss Erik Moore, who's one of the few African Americans in the world of venture capital, and he's tired of talking about it.

The New And The Next

  • Sarah Connor: Art Imitating Life?

    TERMINATOR 2: JUDGMENT DAY, Linda Hamilton, 1991. TriStar Pictures/ Courtesy: Everett Collection
    TriStar Pictures
    TERMINATOR 2: JUDGMENT DAY, Linda Hamilton, 1991. TriStar Pictures/ Courtesy: Everett Collection
    TriStar Pictures

    "Already by 1980 you'd seen the number of single mothers increase by 50 percent, but over the next two decades it went from a growing number to where today a majority of children born to mothers under 30 are born to single mothers."

  • A Tired Conversation In The Valley

    Eric Moore, venture capitalist.
    Ozy.com
    Eric Moore, venture capitalist.
    Ozy.com

    "[Erik] says he's always been often the first or the only [minority venture capitalist], and so continuing to have the conversation about the first and only is not that interesting to him, even though it's important. And he says, in effect, you gotta be tough enough to push through it."

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