Warren Buffett Gets To Keep His Perfect-Bracket Billion

No one managed to predict a perfect bracket for the NCAA tournament. Warren Buffett had promised to give $1 billion to anyone who guessed them all. Lucky for him, he won his bet.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Speaking of the laws of mathematics, the Sweet Sixteen is now the Elite Eight. And by later today, the NCAA basketball tournament will have been winnowed down to that illustrious Final Four. So, the big question. How is your bracket doing? You had San Diego State winning it all, right? Don't despair your ill-fated choices because you are not alone. It's a rare fan who can pick all the winners in the tournament. How rare you say? Well, during March Madness, Quicken Loans partnered with billionaire Warren Buffett to offer a billion-dollar prize to anyone who could pick the winner of every single NCAA game. That possibility evaporated just days after the tournament began. Still, according to USA Today, a couple million dollars will be divided among the top 20 bracket winners and another million will go to youth charities. The lesson in all this is the obvious one: never bet against Buffett. This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Our theme music was written by BJ Leiderman. I'm Rachel Martin.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.