President Obama On Shooting: 'We're Heartbroken'

Journalist Kate McGee, of member station KUT in Austin, joins the program from Texas, delivering an update on the Fort Hood shooting and the responses — both from President Obama and Army officials.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

There has been a shooting at Fort Hood Military Base in Texas. What we know is that one person is confirmed dead and 14 are injured. We've heard an identification of the shooter. We'll have that in a moment. This is the same military base that was the scene of a shooting rampage in 2009 in which 13 people were killed. President Obama spoke a short while ago about today's events.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: We're heartbroken that something like this might have happened again. And I don't want to comment on the facts until I know exactly what has happened. But for now, I would just hope that everybody across the country is keeping the families and the community of Fort Hood in our thoughts and in our prayers.

SIEGEL: We're joined now Kate McGee of member station KUT in Austin. She's at the base at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas, and joins us now. And, Kate, what can you tell us about the shooting?

KATE MCGEE, BYLINE: Well, Robert, at a press conference moments ago, the hospital officials at the Baylor Scott & White Center said there were four injured and two on route to their hospital. They were not IDing whether or not these people were soldiers. And I've heard there are 14 total injured. There's injuries to the extremities, the abdomen, the neck. We're, right now, at the Fort Hood - the entrance of the base where a press conference is being set up right now. We're waiting to hear from officials to get more information on what happened here today. We'll go from there.

SIEGEL: Still very vague, but NPR has been able to confirm the identity of the shooter. The name is Ivan Lopez I gather. And he was a military truck driver. Do we know anything else about him?

MCGEE: Not at this time. The press conference has not begun, and they have not identified the shooter here. They will give more information once officials are able to get ahead of the military base and give more information.

SIEGEL: Kate, all of us, of course, are thinking back on the terrible shooting a few years ago at Fort Hood. What is the scene at the base now? What are people doing?

MCGEE: Well, there's not many people moving around. Once the shooting had occurred, the Fort Hood officials told people on base to shelter in place and have kept that in place throughout the afternoon and only letting essential personnel in and out of the base at this point. And essential personnel - everyone who was leaving the base were being searched by military officials. But shelter in place for residents is still under effect. There was one wife here outside the military base who was not being allowed back in. At the visitors' center, there were - you see Army officials waiting to try to get back inside because they weren't letting anyone in at that point. So it's a lot of waiting to kind of get more information and see what's next here at Fort Hood.

SIEGEL: OK, well, we look forward to hearing more information. Thank you, Kate.

MCGEE: Thank you, Robert.

SIEGEL: That's KUT's Kate McGee talking to us about the shooting at Fort Hood, Texas. At least one person is dead, 14 wounded.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.