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Stenographer Doesn't Hide His Feelings About His Job

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Stenographer Doesn't Hide His Feelings About His Job

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Stenographer Doesn't Hide His Feelings About His Job

Stenographer Doesn't Hide His Feelings About His Job

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Instead of taking down trial testimony, he typed over and over, "I hate my job, I hate my job." The New York Post reports he did that in 30 case before he was caught. He was fired.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Anybody who's seen a trial knows a stenographer takes down the proceedings. The New York Post reports one stenographer hated his job. And we have a record of this because he wrote it down. Instead of taking down trial testimony, he typed over and over: I hate my job. I hate my job.

(SOUNDBITE OF TYPING)

INSKEEP: We're not sure what happened when the testimony had to be read back, but he did it in 30 cases before he was caught. And at least he was telling the truth.

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