Senate Committee Votes To Declassify CIA Interrogations Report

The Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to ask the CIA to declassify portions of a committee report detailing the agency's interrogation of terrorism suspects after Sept. 11, 2001.

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The Senate intelligence committee voted yesterday in favor of declassifying a huge report that's been kept under wraps for nearly a year and a half. It's the so-called torture report on the interrogation and secret detention program carried out by the CIA following the 9/11 attacks. NPR's David Welna reports.

DAVID WELNA, BYLINE: Only a 450-page summary of the report and its 20 findings would actually be declassified. New Mexico Democratic Senator Martin Heinrich predicts a big impact.

SENATOR MARTIN HEINRICH: When people see the content when it's declassified, I think people will be shocked at what's inside.

WELNA: Georgia Republican Saxby Chambliss voted to release the report, but defends the CIA's actions.

SENATOR SAXBY CHAMBLISS: There is absolutely concrete evidence that has been gleaned from the individuals who were interrogated in this program.

WELNA: Panel members want the declassification done within a month, though it could take longer. David Welna, NPR News, the Capitol.

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