A Spicy Gold Rush: Turmeric's Rise To Superfood

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

This week, Watson tells guest host Kelly McEvers about the growing popularity of turmeric in the U.S. The spice, which comes from a golden-yellow root native to India, is heralded for its health benefits and is being infused into a variety of food products. Some mixologists are even working it into cocktails.

They also discuss the boom in online, subscription clothing services to help men find the perfect style without ever entering a store.

The New And The Next

  • Varied Uses For A Golden Root

    The spice comes from a golden-yellow root native to India. i i

    The spice comes from a golden-yellow root native to India. Adeel Halim/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

    itoggle caption Adeel Halim/Bloomberg via Getty Images
    The spice comes from a golden-yellow root native to India.

    The spice comes from a golden-yellow root native to India.

    Adeel Halim/Bloomberg via Getty Images

    "Turmeric: We get it in a lot of Indian curries, and now it's the latest superfood craze. So Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, all of the healthy places are starting to stock it heavily ... There are all sorts of delicious elixirs, drinks that you can buy ... You've got lotions, you've got soaps.

    And part of it ... is a belief that not only has it flavored food, but that it's got healthy properties. For years, lots of Indian families, both in India and overseas, have used it against colds. Some people say they use it for eczema or skin diseases and even others, our own American Dr. Oz recommends it for fighting depression."

    Read ' "Poor Man's Saffron" Hits The U.S.' On Ozy.com

  • Finding The Personal Style Without Leaving The House

    "Personal stylists have been around for a long time. More women have used [stylists] than men in recent times, and there've been lots of services, including over the Net. ... You send in your measurements ... they also, by the way, look at some of your social media indicators — so, where you live because that tells about climate and other sorts of things. ... Sometimes a person comes directly to you, a stylist who ultimately helps your narrow down the choices. ...

    There are a handful of interesting young companies — one is called Bombfell, another is called the Trunk Club — that in various ways are helping mainly young men, at this point, buy clothes, primarily for work."

    Read 'Men Don't Gotta Go To The Mall' On Ozy.com

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