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The Ohio Snake Art That's Been Mid-Slither For A Millennium

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The Ohio Snake Art That's Been Mid-Slither For A Millennium

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The Ohio Snake Art That's Been Mid-Slither For A Millennium

The Ohio Snake Art That's Been Mid-Slither For A Millennium

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The Serpent Mound in southern Ohio is 3 feet high and more than 1,300 feet long. Courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society. hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society.

The Serpent Mound in southern Ohio is 3 feet high and more than 1,300 feet long.

Courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society.

In new installment of the Spring Break series, Noah Adams visits the Serpent Mound in southern Ohio. It's not a burial site; it's a massive, grass-covered effigy of a snake, created a thousand years ago.

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