Powdered Alcohol Approved By The Feds

Palchohol is powdered alcohol — just mix with water to create an instant cocktail. The creators of Palcohol pitched their idea as a solution to the soaring price of alcohol.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Palchohol.

Powdered alcohol, you know, sort of like powdered lemonade, you just mix in some water and you create an instant cocktail.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The creators of Palchohol pitched their idea as a solution to the soaring price of alcohol. Perfect for the modern drinker on a budget. Maybe you don't want to spend 10 bucks for a mixed drink at a stadium.

INSKEEP: Mm-hmm.

MONTAGNE: Maybe you can't buy alcohol at the movies. I don't think so. No problem. Bring along packets of margarita-flavored Palchohol and you will only need to buy $5 bottle of water to mix it in.

(LAUGHTER)

INSKEEP: OK. The creators insist they're not really urging you to bring alcohol into places where you're not supposed to - although, they did suggest that on their website at one time.

(LAUGHTER)

INSKEEP: Now that Palchohol has been approved by federal regulators, the message on the company's website encourages drinkers to use their product in a responsible and legal manner.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Let's go get a drink. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: All right. And I'm Renee Montagne. Sorry.

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