Remembering Judy Garland On Stage At Carnegie Hall

It's been called "the greatest night in show business history." Judy Garland performed at Carnegie Hall on this day in 1961. There were no flashing lights, no extravagant dance numbers, just Judy.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Next, we have a voice that's likely been heard in every country on earth. It's the voice of Judy Garland, who, on this day in 1961, delivered one of her most famous performances.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED PERFORMANCE RECORDING)

JUDY GARLAND: (Singing) A clown with his pants falling down, or the dance that's a dream of romance, or the scene where the villain is me, that's entertainment...

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

She's performing here in Carnegie Hall. There were no flashing lights, no extravagant dance numbers, just Judy. Some audience members were excited, they interrupted her.

(SOUNDBITE OF YELLING)

GARLAND: I know. I'll sing them all, and we'll stay all night.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMEWHERE OVER THE RAINBOW")

GARLAND: (Singing) Somewhere over the rainbow...

INSKEEP: Judy Garland was making a comeback. She battled drug and alcohol abuse. At the age of 38, she had already had a long concert and film career, including, of course, her role as Dorothy in "The Wizard of Oz."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMEWHERE OVER THE RAINBOW")

GARLAND: (Singing) ...over the rainbow, why then, oh, why can't I?

MONTAGNE: The recording of that concert received four Grammys, including Album of the Year.

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