With SuperShoes, Insoles Can Be Your Guide

SuperShoes are squishy insoles that fit inside your shoes. Inside those insoles are "vibrotactile ticklers" linked to your mobile device. Enter a destination and the ticklers guide your way.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: SuperShoes.

This new high-tech offering is not exactly footwear. SuperShoes are squishy insoles that fit inside your shoes.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And inside those insoles are vibrotactile ticklers that are linked to your mobile device. You enter a destination and apparently these ticklers will guide your way, with a tickle to the left or a tickle to the right.

INSKEEP: Or a constant tickle to let you know you have arrived at your destination. Enter what you like or dislike and SuperShoes can take you to a favorite restaurant or keep you away from a restaurant you would rather avoid.

GREENE: Seems like one more bit of technology that gets us dependent on smartphones, though the creator of SuperShoes insists that this product can actually set you free.

INSKEEP: Oh, yeah. Instead of staring at a map on your phone to guide you to your destination, SuperShoes will allow you to take in your surroundings with just a soothing sensation.

GREENE: Sounds lovely.

INSKEEP: I wonder if SuperShoes could also like kick you if you start saying something inappropriate. There's so many things...

GREENE: Stop it. Stop it. Stop it.

INSKEEP: All right.

GREENE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep. Something in my - something in my shoe here.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.