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Panel Round One

Came in Like a Whiffle Ball.

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We want to remind everybody they can join us here most weeks at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago. For tickets or more information go to WBEZ.org, or you can find a link at our website waitwait.npr.org.

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Brian, you're probably familiar with Miley Cyrus's hit song "Wrecking Ball."

BRIAN BABYLON: No.

(LAUGHTER)

(Laughing)

(Laughing)

SAGAL: If I know you, you're watching the video with the sound off, Brian.

BABYLON: No. OK, OK.

SAGAL: OK, anyway. It's the one where she's, like, naked and singing I came in like a wrecking ball. Well, that song was criticized this week - came in for significant criticism from whom?

(LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: It's not Tipper Gore. She doesn't do that anymore.

SAGAL: No.

BABYLON: OK, she's out of that game.

SAGAL: No.

BABYLON: OK. Give me a hint.

SAGAL: Instead of being published in, say, Rolling Stone or a music magazine, this criticism was published in a peer-reviewed journal.

BABYLON: Like a doctor thing? Like other doctors write about?

SAGAL: Yeah, doctors.

BABYLON: Oh, this procedure.

SAGAL: More broadly. Who else wears white coats like doctors?

BABYLON: Psychologically Today?

(LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: I don't know. I - honestly. This is...

: I don't know either.

SAGAL: Tom, you look like you know this. You want to take it?

TOM BODETT: Scientists?

SAGAL: Scientists, yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Scientists.

BABYLON: Oh, man.

BODETT: Newtonian scientists.

SAGAL: Yeah, physicists specifically. Apparently, all the actual science that needs doing has been done because researchers at England's...

BABYLON: Man...

SAGAL: ...University of Leicester decided to find out what would happen if indeed Miley Cyrus were to take the place of a wrecking ball.

: Oh, no.

SAGAL: They determined that a woman of her height and weight would need to be swinging at about 360 miles per hour...

: Oh, dear.

SAGAL: ...In order to bash through the walls of someone's house. Based on this, the researcher concludes, quote, "it is clear that a human being cannot possess the characteristics of a wrecking ball without sustaining significant injury."

: I don't know. I feel like the only thing they may not be taking into account, though, is how dense Miley Cyrus actually is.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Coming up, our panelists try to chillax. It's our bluff the listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT WAIT to play.

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