Who Wears Short Shorts?

Hemlines are on the rise this summer. The Wall Street Journal spotted the trend, pointing out that inseams have gone from about 15 inches to more like seven.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And for today's last word in business, we have a new answer to an old question.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED MEN: (Singing) Who wears short shorts?

UNIDENTIFIED WOMEN: (Singing) We wear short shorts.

INSKEEP: Apparently, now and men where short shorts. And that is a change. In recent years, as you may have noticed, the styles of men's shorts have not been all that short at all. In fact, our editor David McGuffin's 13-year-old son recently complained that his soccer shorts were too short because they were above the knee.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now what you might call hemlines are on the rise this summer. The Wall Street Journal spotted the trend, pointing out that inseams have gone from about 15 inches to more like 7.

INSKEEP: And those shorter shorts are showing up in somewhat preppy places, like J. Crew and Club Monaco. Some are as short as 5 inches. Think NBA, around 1976.

MONTAGNE: We're looking forward to you modeling the latest fashion, Steve.

INSKEEP: Oh, darn, we're out of time. No.

MONTAGNE: All right, stand up. Let's see.

INSKEEP: No. No. There's no time. We're all out of time. We've got to hit this post - as we call it in broadcasting - by saying it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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