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'Morning Edition' Friday: An Obama Critic On The West Point Speech

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'Morning Edition' Friday: An Obama Critic On The West Point Speech

Politics

'Morning Edition' Friday: An Obama Critic On The West Point Speech

'Morning Edition' Friday: An Obama Critic On The West Point Speech

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/317127103/317127104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Friday's Morning Edition, Republican Sen. Bob Corker addresses President Obama's foreign policy vision.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

President Obama mapped out his vision for foreign policy yesterday in a commencement speech at West Point. Obama was taking on criticism that his approach to global affairs has been too cautious. But Republicans weren't any more satisfied after that speech. Tomorrow morning we'll hear from one of his biggest critics.

SENATOR BOB CORKER: I would suggest that he takes a speech that he did yesterday, throw it in the circular file, start again with something much more decisive and clear.

BLOCK: That is Tennessee Senator Bob Corker, the top Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He just returned from visiting NATO allies in Eastern Europe. You can hear his full interview tomorrow on MORNING EDITION here on NPR News.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is NPR News.

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