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British Study: Water Is Key To A Perfect Cup Of Coffee
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British Study: Water Is Key To A Perfect Cup Of Coffee

Business

British Study: Water Is Key To A Perfect Cup Of Coffee

British Study: Water Is Key To A Perfect Cup Of Coffee
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The study published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, found the chemical composition of different kinds of water is important to bringing out different flavors from the coffee bean.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in Business is something of great importance to us here at MORNING EDITION - coffee. A British study says the secret to the perfect cup of coffee is the water.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The study, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, found the chemical composition of different kinds of water is the key to bringing out different flavors from the coffee bean. Now, Steve, here's a list of a few of the study's brewing tips. If you use tap water, let it run for a few seconds before filling your pot. Use cold water and never ever use distilled or softened water.

INSKEEP: You want more chemicals in the water.

GREENE: Absolutely.

INSKEEP: More stuff.

GREENE: Yeah, that's the key. And that's the Business News on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

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