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Jenny Scheinman Reaches Out To Her Father In Song

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Jenny Scheinman Reaches Out To Her Father In Song

Music Interviews

Jenny Scheinman Reaches Out To Her Father In Song

Jenny Scheinman Reaches Out To Her Father In Song

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/321673767/321779026" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the last year, he's started saying, "I love you." And he never did [when I] was a kid. Maybe it's because I wrote the song as a way of saying, "Can you tell me you love me ... more? Do you?"

Jenny Scheinman says that since writing and performing The Littlest Prisoner's "Just a Child," the song has "really transformed" her relationship with her father. She tells NPR's Melissa Block about growing up in Humboldt County, Calif., and how music was a "peaceful place" in a chaotic home. Hear the conversation at the audio link above.

For more conversations with music makers, check out NPR's Music Interviews.

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