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Afghans Are The Winners In Their Presidential Elections
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Afghans Are The Winners In Their Presidential Elections

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Afghans Are The Winners In Their Presidential Elections

Afghans Are The Winners In Their Presidential Elections
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Host Scott Simon takes note of the huge turnout and great pride Afghans exhibited during their presidential election runoff.

SCOTT SIMON, BYLINE: After generations of war and violence, Afghans are poised to make history with blue fingers. Seven million people voted in the country's runoff presidential election this weekend in Afghanistan's first democratic transfer of power. Abdullah Abdullah, who was Afghanistan's former foreign minister, is running against Ashraf Ghani, a former World Bank economist. Photos on social media show Afghan men and women standing in long lines at polling booths, so proudly displaying a finger dipped in blue ink used to mark the ballot. One picture posted by a former NPR producer in Kabul days before the election shows a group of smiling, young Afghans brandishing their voter ID cards with the caption, we will vote for a better Afghanistan. Say no to the enemies of Afghanistan. It will be weeks before all the votes are counted, but Afghans have won a lot just by showing up to vote.

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