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When It Comes To Dating, Some People Have A Type

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When It Comes To Dating, Some People Have A Type

Business

When It Comes To Dating, Some People Have A Type

When It Comes To Dating, Some People Have A Type

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/323510610/323510611" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Match.com is partnering with another service to offer facial-recognition technology. It will compare photos of clients' exes with database photos in the hopes of finding faces with similar features.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And our last word in Business Today is doppelganger dating. The online dating site match.com is banking on the fact that some people, no matter how they deny it, have a type when they're searching for a mate.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

So it's partnering with the LA-based matchmaking service Three Day Rule to offer facial recognition technology. It will compare photos of the clients' exes with photos in the dating sight's databases with the hope of finding faces with similar features.

WERTHEIMER: But potential lovebirds be warned, your wallet may not love this new feature. The premium service will set you back $5,000.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CAN'T BUY ME LOVE")

WERTHEIMER: And that's the Business News on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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