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Sputtering On Fumes, 'True Blood' Has Outstayed Its Welcome

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Sputtering On Fumes, 'True Blood' Has Outstayed Its Welcome

Television

Sputtering On Fumes, 'True Blood' Has Outstayed Its Welcome

Sputtering On Fumes, 'True Blood' Has Outstayed Its Welcome

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HBO's True Blood, which returns for its final season Sunday, is a prime example of a TV show that kept going long after it should have ended. It's not alone, though: Other shows have stayed too long at the party, including Dexter and Law & Order: SVU. Why is it that some shows stay on air well after they've run out of creative juice?

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