Panel Round One

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Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Baristronauts.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We want to remind everybody to join us most weeks back at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago, Illinois, or at our upcoming show at beautiful Red Rocks Amphitheater in Colorado, July 10th. See what it looks like when public radio people go outside.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: For tickets or more information, go to wbez.org, or you can find a link at our website, which is waitwait.npr.org. Right now, panel, though, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Kyrie, later this year, the Italian Space Agency will launch its Futura Mission. And to prepare for the arrival of Italian astronauts, the International Space Station announced it will do what?

O'CONNOR: Send up a shipment of garlic?

SAGAL: No.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They're installing something on the space station for the Italians' comfort and enjoyment.

O'CONNOR: A pasta maker?

SAGAL: Close.

O'CONNOR: Oh, close.

SAGAL: Something Italians like.

O'CONNOR: A decent coffee maker?

SAGAL: Exactly. An espresso machine.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: The Americans and Russians might be content, you know, with weak coffee from the space Dunkin' Donuts, but not the Italians. The Italian coffee company Lavazza has designed the world's first, space espresso machine. They called it the ISSpresso machine - ISS, International Space Station.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yeah. Thank you.

BILL KURTIS, BYLINE: Very clever.

SAGAL: Thank you, Italy. Seems excessive, but keep in mind, the Americans make water up there by recycling their own urine.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The Italians were like, yeah, we'll make our own coffee. Thanks.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: An American's like, no, I'll operate it. I had a big Gatorade this morning. I'm ready to do a latte. Let's go.

(LAUGHTER)

MAZ JOBRANI: I wonder - they must have, like, the nicest spacesuits 'cause I know that Alitalia - that...

SAGAL: Oh, they're fitted. They're fitted, man.

JOBRANI: Yeah, the suits are designed by Armani on Alitalia. It's true. And so I wonder if they have, like, (speaking with Italian accent) hey, ciao bella.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: (Speaking with Italian accent) The drape on the spacesuits - very nice.

JOBRANI: (Speaking with Italian accent) This helmet's a little too big. Can you make it a little smaller? I want it feeling good.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: (Speaking with Italian accent) I don't know how to fly this thing, but I look good.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Coming up - yo. It's not just for Rocky Balboa anymore. It's our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations and Gevalia, over 150 years of Swedish expertise dedicated to the art of coffee making. Gevalia, rich, never bitter. The Sy Syms Foundation, supporting advances in science, education and the arts since 1985, sysymsfoundation.org, and Progressive Insurance, with more than 30,000 local and agents. Information is available at progressive.com. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT ...DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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