Review: Lana Del Rey, 'Ultraviolence' Lana Del Rey continues a time-honored pop tradition of developing a public persona that challenges fans to decide what's real and what's not.
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Lana Del Rey's 'Ultraviolence' Has A Firm Grasp On Pop History

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Lana Del Rey's 'Ultraviolence' Has A Firm Grasp On Pop History

Lana Del Rey's 'Ultraviolence' Has A Firm Grasp On Pop History

Lana Del Rey's 'Ultraviolence' Has A Firm Grasp On Pop History

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Lana Del Rey is a figure of some controversy for her suggestive lyrics, and critical debate as to the extent of her vocal talent versus her talent for publicity. She recently caused a stir when she gave an interview in which she said, quote, "I wish I was dead already," and drew criticism from, among others, Kurt Cobain's daughter Frances Bean. Fresh Air music critic Ken Tucker hears Del Rey and her new album, Ultraviolence, as continuing a time-honored pop tradition of developing a public persona that challenges fans to decide what's real and what's not.