Own A South Dakota Prairie Town For $400,000

The owner of Swett, S.D. — population 2 — put the whole town on the market last week. By "whole" we mean 6 acres, including a bar, a workshop, three trailers and a single house.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And that brings us to the last word in Business which is no sweat. You too can own a piece of the old American frontier.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

An entire town nestled in the flat prairie lands of South Dakota is up for sale for $400,000. You can own Swett - S, W, E, T, T - Swett, South Dakota.

MONTAGNE: There isn't much to sweat. It's just over six acres of land. It includes a bar, a workshop, three trailers and a single house. Lance Benson is the town's sole owner. He put it on the market last week, according to the Rapid City Journal.

GREENE: Swett has an official population of two, counting Benson and his wife - three if you include their pet Rottweiler, Daisy. That is down significantly from its 1940s peak of 40 people. Back then it even had a post office.

MONTAGNE: Although the town has shrunk a bit, it still has one big selling point - the Swett Tavern. Once described as the kind of place you needed a knife to get into and a chainsaw to get out of, now reportedly it has a more family feel.

GREENE: And it is the only watering hole for a couple miles; a good place to sit down, have a drink and wipe that sweat off your brow. That's the Business News on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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