Self-Described Optimist Taylor Swift On The Future Of Music

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In an op-ed in Monday's Wall Street Journal, the singer-songwriter writes that "the value of an album is ... based on the amount of heart and soul an artist has bled into a body of work."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're going to profile the musician Sia in a moment. But first we have a little music economics courtesy of Taylor Swift. The pop superstar wrote an op-ed for The Wall Street Journal yesterday about the future of the music industry.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

She's optimistic, despite the industry's tumultuous business landscape. According to Swift, however, the value of an album is based on the amount of heart and soul an artist has bled into a body of work.

INSKEEP: She acknowledges fans are more selective about which albums they actually go out to purchase these days, which is a creative challenge for artists that should motivate them.

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