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U.S. Border Patrol Chief Faces Media Scrutiny Head-On

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U.S. Border Patrol Chief Faces Media Scrutiny Head-On

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U.S. Border Patrol Chief Faces Media Scrutiny Head-On

U.S. Border Patrol Chief Faces Media Scrutiny Head-On

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On Friday, we'll hear from the new commissioner of Customs and Border Protection Gil Kerlikowske, and find out why he's pushing for more transparency at his agency.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And we've been reporting on another border controversy, a series of violent incidents in which U.S. Border Patrol agents killed civilians. Sometimes, years passed without any conclusion on whether the shootings were right or wrong.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A new commissioner, Gil Kerlikowske, says that Border Patrol needs to show greater openness. And he has now given MORNING EDITION his first extended interview on the agency's use of force.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

GIL KERLIKOWSKE: There is a certain sense in law enforcement that if we just keep our heads down, all of this will go away - meaning media scrutiny and nongovernmental organizations. That doesn't happen.

INSKEEP: Commissioner Gil Kerlikowske took our questions for close to an hour. And we'll hear him tomorrow on MORNING EDITION as well as at npr.org. It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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