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School Science Project Gets Attention; U.S. Group Aids Migrant Kids; Music From Jenny Lewis

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School Project Gets Attention; U.S. Group Aids Migrant Kids; Music From Jenny Lewis

School Project Gets Attention; U.S. Group Aids Migrant Kids; Music From Jenny Lewis

School Science Project Gets Attention; U.S. Group Aids Migrant Kids; Music From Jenny Lewis

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/333365600/333379634" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lauren Arrington's sixth-grade research project is cited in a science journal. Courtesy of Lauren Arrington hide caption

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Courtesy of Lauren Arrington

Lauren Arrington's sixth-grade research project is cited in a science journal.

Courtesy of Lauren Arrington

In this show, Lauren Arrington's sixth-grade lionfish project catches ecologists' attention, El Rescate in LA aids Central American migrants, and Jenny Lewis has an introspective new solo album.

Editor's note on July 24: The original headline on this page said "Girl's Project Shocks Scientists." We've changed the headline to better reflect the effect Lauren's project has had on the scientific community. We've also changed the text — which had used the word "shocks," too — because marine biologist Zachary Jud and others had previously done work on the lionfish's ability to survive in estuaries.

For a timeline on the work that's been done by scientists, see this blog post written by Professor Craig Layman of North Carolina State University. He concludes that "Lauren had made a contribution to science. One can argue the magnitude of this finding, but a contribution regardless."