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The Ice Cream Sandwich That Wouldn't Melt

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The Ice Cream Sandwich That Wouldn't Melt

Business

The Ice Cream Sandwich That Wouldn't Melt

The Ice Cream Sandwich That Wouldn't Melt

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/336019414/336026185" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After an ice cream sandwich from Wal-Mart was left outside on an 80-degree day and didn't melt, a Cincinnati-area mom questioned what's in it. Wal-Mart said a lot of cream.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in Business Today is indestructible ice cream. A mother in the Cincinnati area, Christie Watson, told a local TV station that her son left an ice cream sandwich from Walmart's Great Value brand outside for twelve hours on an 80 degree day and it didn't melt.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Watson expressed concern about what was in the ice cream sandwich that kept it from melting. A Walmart spokesman gave the Huffington Post a simple explanation - ice cream with more cream melts slower. And their ice cream is very creamy.

MONTAGNE: Others have pointed out that Great Value ice cream sandwiches contain a number of additives, including thickening agents, just one percent or less of stuff like cellulose gum, calcium sulfate, vanilla extract, carrageenan and artificial flavor.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

WERTHEIMER: And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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