What If 'Gone With The Wind' Had This Ending, Instead?

NPR's Scott Simon takes a moment to note a newly found script for the film Gone With the Wind that contains an alternate ending.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Here's a scrap of alternative history that never came to be. "Gone With the Wind" ends with Scarlett O'Hara asking Rhett Butler, Rhett, Rhett, Rhett, if you go, where shall I go? What shall I do? - and Rhett replying.

CLARK GABLE: (As Rhett Butler) Frankly, my, dear I don't give a damn.

SIMON: Followed by scholars quick recovery.

VIVIEN LEIGH: (As Scarlett O'Hara) (Inaudible).

SIMON: But a script from the member of the crew of 1939 film has recently been found in which Scarlett says, Rhett, Rhett, Rhett - you'll come back. You'll come back. I know you will - want to bet? Margaret Barrett of Heritage Auctions, which has script up for bid, told the Independent Newspaper, in the original, Scarlett comes across as a determined woman who will survive with or without Rhett. But this alternative ending is much more traditional. Ms. Barrett thinks the producers chose the right ending. Scarlet is such an enduring character, she says, because she is so independent. She was way ahead of her time. Opening bid for the script is $500. We just told you the line for free.

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