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With New Parenting Apps, More Dads Are Phoning It In

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With New Parenting Apps, More Dads Are Phoning It In

Digital Life

With New Parenting Apps, More Dads Are Phoning It In

With New Parenting Apps, More Dads Are Phoning It In

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/340153409/340153410" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Move over, parenting books: Apps are one of the newest ways that dads can learn how to be dads. Dave Burton, creator of the app Quick Tips for New Dads, explains.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Support for new dads comes in many forms - family, friends, books and oh, yes, there's an app for that - several actually. One of the latest is designed by a clueless dad for other dads - could be...

DAVE BURTON: Prince William, future King of England, or David Beckham, international footballer, or a bald bloke called Dave.

BLOCK: That's Dave Burton. Yes, he is bald. He's also the creator of Quick Tips for New Dads. And since he's British, the app he refers to nappies, not diapers. His app also covers feeding, bathing, crying - we assume he's talking about the baby - sleep deprivation - that would be yours - and bonding. It's something Burton wishes he'd had at his fingertips a couple of years ago when he was a brand-new dad.

BURTON: We're all stripped-back to that raw basic human nature of we've got children in there's poo and there's pee and there's weird stuff going on. An we're all on a level playing field.

BLOCK: Handy as the app may be, Dave Burton will be the first to admit that it's no substitute for real life experience.

BURTON: You have to wait for the baby to arrive to adapt and survive really and kind of muddle your way through the best you can.

BLOCK: And as far as we know, there's no app for that.

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