Weekend Host Accepts Ice-Bucket Challenge

People are dumping buckets of ice water over their heads all across the country to raise money for research on ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). NPR's Scott Simon accepts the challenge.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

People are dumping buckets of ice water over their heads all across the country. The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has raised money at a historic rate to benefit research into ALS. Celebrities, billionaires, sports stars, fire companies, Hollywood stars, teachers, mayors, priests, ex-presidents, Oprah, Conan, LeBron, all kinds of people have been challenged to get doused or write a check. Most have done both. The ALS Association has raised more than $53 million with this challenge. It's being seen as a model for modern fundraising.

In another couple of weeks, there may not be a dry person left in the United States. Now, I've been challenged by a number of people on Twitter. I've gotten to know some people with ALS. It's a cruel neurological disorder that a lot of people live with very bravely. So we went out onto one of the decks of NPR's headquarters. Our staff was happy to help out.

We have one of our editors here, who has been living for this opportunity for a long time. The condemned man - (water splashing) when are you going to pour it over my head?

(LAUGHTER)

SIMON: Oh, is it over? I didn't notice.

I'm still a little wet.

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