Calif. Lawmakers Overturn Ban On Pets At Restaurants

Businesses may now permit dogs in their outdoor spaces such as patios or courtyards. Previously they faced fines for health violations.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That brings us to our last word in Business Today, which is bone appetite.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Steve, isn't it bon appetit?

INSKEEP: You would think so, David. But in this case the last word in business is bone appetite because California lawmakers overturned a ban on pets in bars and restaurants.

GREENE: Businesses may now permit dogs in their outdoor spaces, like patios or courtyards. Previously they faced fines for health violations.

INSKEEP: And those celebrating reportedly include the first dog of California, Sutter Brown - Governor Jerry Brown's dog, which is now allowed to show up in restaurants. Sutter's Twitter account celebrated with a message, quote, "no more doggie bags."

GREENE: It has been a busy time for Governor Brown's pets. Sutter made news just last week when the governor declined the ice bucket challenge - his dog went through with it. Is that right?

INSKEEP: That is cruel.

GREENE: That's the Business News on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.