Student Attendance Drops At College Football Games

Student attendance at games has gone down on average 7 percent since 2009, according to The Wall Street Journal. Rising ticket prices along with televised games are to blame.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And the college football season has begun. Many students are responding with the old college cheer, it goes something like this.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Meh.

INSKEEP: David, you're supposed to let out some kind of enthusiastic cheer.

GREENE: Meh.

INSKEEP: Well, I guest that fits because our last word in Business today is armchair quarterbacks. Many students ignore college football games.

GREENE: Unbelievable. According to The Wall Street Journal, student attendance at games has gone down on average 7 percent since 2009. Rising ticket prices are blamed along with TV, more people apparently watch from the armchair at home.

INSKEEP: The home-field advantage is becoming a home-screen advantage, which is not so great for the home teams since your fans' shouts are harder to hear when they are at home.

GREENE: Schools also worry that less attendance means less school pride and also smaller alumni donations later.

INSKEEP: And that's the Business News on MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.