Anthony D'Amato: A Songsmith Schooled By A Master Poet As a student at Princeton, D'Amato was mentored in his songwriting by professor and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon.
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Anthony D'Amato: A Songsmith Schooled By A Master Poet

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Anthony D'Amato: A Songsmith Schooled By A Master Poet

Anthony D'Amato: A Songsmith Schooled By A Master Poet

Anthony D'Amato: A Songsmith Schooled By A Master Poet

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Anthony D'Amato's latest album is The Shipwreck from the Shore. Bianca Bourgeois/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Bianca Bourgeois/Courtesy of the artist

Anthony D'Amato's latest album is The Shipwreck from the Shore.

Bianca Bourgeois/Courtesy of the artist

When Anthony D'Amato was a junior at Princeton, he slipped a home-burned CD under the door of a professor — not a professor of music, and certainly no record executive.

It was the door of Paul Muldoon, the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, critic and poetry editor of The New Yorker, who began to work with D'Amato. Five years later, the student is on the music scene, winning praise for folk-rock songs that demonstrate a plain, sometimes flip poetry of their own.

D'Amato's new album is called The Shipwreck from the Shore. He spoke about the process behind it with NPR's Scott Simon; hear the conversation at the audio link.