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Joan Rivers On Her Own Funeral: 'I Want Paparazzi'

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Joan Rivers On Her Own Funeral: 'I Want Paparazzi'

Remembrances

Joan Rivers On Her Own Funeral: 'I Want Paparazzi'

Joan Rivers On Her Own Funeral: 'I Want Paparazzi'

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A collection of memorable interviews with the comedy queen, Joan Rivers, who passed away this week at the age of 81.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Joan Rivers knew what she wanted for her memorial service. I want paparazzi and I want publicists making a scene, she once wrote. I don't want some rabbi rambling on. I want Meryl Streep crying in five different accents.

We got to interview her a few times. Joan Rivers really was unruly and outrageous. She was also hilarious and we can reveal it now - nice. For someone who joked about how much plastic surgery she'd had done, she was genuine.

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JOAN RIVERS: I am so lucky. I always said, if I can make a living - just make a living, pay my car payment by being in the business; writing and performing, I'm lucky. And that's - to this day, that's what I always think.

SIMON: But Joan Rivers had a struggle just to get on stage, a woman who made audiences squeal as well as laugh. Her husband took his life. She found out in a phone message, leaving his daughter and wife to wonder why and what if.

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RIVERS: So what makes me laugh is, of course, the absurd, the horror - anything that upsets me. I talk about how I hate children because I really love them. You know, so I reverse a lot of stuff.

SIMON: You hate children? You love your daughter.

RIVERS: I adore my daughter. But it kind of hurt when she started to cry when she found out she wasn't adopted.

SIMON: And when Joan Rivers died this week at the age of 81, her daughter Melissa Rivers said, my mother's greatest joy in life was to make people laugh.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

RIVERS: I say exactly what I think and very often, it's totally politically incorrect. And totally - I get always chastised for it. And I also think - serious for a second?

SIMON: Yeah.

RIVERS: Life is so tough. I don't know how old you are, but I have seen so much in a wink. One phone call and your life is changed forever. We all know that.

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