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Could Genetics Hold The Answer To Curing Autism?

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Could Genetics Hold The Answer To Curing Autism?

Could Genetics Hold The Answer To Curing Autism?

Could Genetics Hold The Answer To Curing Autism?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/342135819/347715386" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More From This Episode

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode From Curiosity To Discovery.

About Wendy Chung's TED Talk

Geneticist Wendy Chung describes what it's like to chip away at the mysteries of autism, and the excitement of uncovering tiny but critical clues.

About Wendy Chung

Wendy Chung is the director of clinical research at the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, which does both basic and applied science to serve people affected by autism spectrum disorders. She's the principal investigator of the foundation's Simons Variation in Individuals Project, which characterizes behavior and brain structure and function in participants with genetic copy number variants such as those at 16p11.2, which are believed to play a role in spectrum disorders. Chung also directs the clinical genetics program at Columbia University. In assessing and treating kids with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disabilities, she uses advanced genomic diagnostics to explore the genetic basis of neurological conditions.

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