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Gail Simmons: A Top Chef's Duel
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Gail Simmons: A Top Chef's Duel

Gail Simmons: A Top Chef's Duel

Gail Simmons: A Top Chef's Duel
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Gail Simmons can't always resist a little truffle oil... even if it's artificial. i

Gail Simmons can't always resist a little truffle oil... even if it's artificial. Courtesy of Gail Simmons hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Gail Simmons
Gail Simmons can't always resist a little truffle oil... even if it's artificial.

Gail Simmons can't always resist a little truffle oil... even if it's artificial.

Courtesy of Gail Simmons

In her Ask Me Another Challenge, we asked Gail Simmons to identify and pass judgment on some ubiquitous food trends currently dominating restaurant menus, from kale chips to quinoa. But even if the review is a thumbs-down, the food writer and judge on TV's cooking competition show Top Chef says she can't always resist. "Truffle oil is the thing that everyone loves to hate," Simmons said. "But, you know, once in a while ... don't deny it."

But don't get her started on cake pops. "I don't want to offend anybody, but they are one of my most-hated things in the universe. I just want a piece of cake! There's nothing wrong with a piece of cake."

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