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Parasite Turns Bees Into Zombie-Like Creatures

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Parasite Turns Bees Into Zombie-Like Creatures

Animals

Parasite Turns Bees Into Zombie-Like Creatures

Parasite Turns Bees Into Zombie-Like Creatures

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/360300811/360300812" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biologists are reporting signs of a possible zombie apocalypse. Well, at least for the honeybee population. A parasite that has been turning bees on the West Coast into zombie-like creatures has started infecting bees in the East, and biologists are still puzzled as to how it all works.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's Halloween, so it's prime time to hear from a California biologist who studies an otherwise obscure subject.

JOHN HAFERNIK: From time to time, I give talks, and I call it The Flight of the Living Dead.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

John Hafernik of San Francisco State studies the zombie fly. It lays eggs inside a honeybee turning the bee into a zom-bee.

HAFERNIK: Flying out of their hives at night, a time when bees shouldn't be active, coming to lights and then flying around in a really disoriented kind of like zombie-like fashion.

MONTAGNE: The parasite was first observed on the West Coast during studies on declining bee populations. And now, there are zom-bee sightings as far east as Pennsylvania.

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