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Orchestra Eats, Then Performs, The World's Hottest Tango

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Orchestra Eats, Then Performs, The World's Hottest Tango

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Orchestra Eats, Then Performs, The World's Hottest Tango

Orchestra Eats, Then Performs, The World's Hottest Tango

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/360859093/360859094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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How hot is the Tango? A Danish orchestra chowed down on the hottest pepper on the planet and then played the Tango Jalousie, while fighting back the tears.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Oh, the tango. It's hot; really hot. There may be no more passionate piece of music out there, in fact. And what you're hearing now isn't mere musical emotion. It's the musicians of the Danish Symphony Orchestra playing the Tango Jalousie. Right after, every member - winds, strings, brass - tucked into a Caroline reaper, the world's hottest pepper.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TANGO JALOUSIE")

MARTIN: Apparently, a man who goes by the name of Chili Klaus and is a Danish chili pepper enthusiast convinced the orchestra to take his dare. Whatever the motivation, their bravery is unquestionable as is their commitment to the music. Red-faced, coughing and breathless, they continued the tango to the very end. The chilies - or was it the beauty of the music? - brought them all to tears. Of course, upon completion, they rushed offstage, probably to get a glass of milk.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TANGO JALOUSIE")

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