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'Morning Edition' Celebrates 35 Years With A Trip Down Memory Lane
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'Morning Edition' Celebrates 35 Years With A Trip Down Memory Lane

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'Morning Edition' Celebrates 35 Years With A Trip Down Memory Lane

'Morning Edition' Celebrates 35 Years With A Trip Down Memory Lane
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Bob Edwards was the host of Morning Edition from its 1979 inception until 2004. i

Bob Edwards was the host of Morning Edition from its 1979 inception until 2004. Max Hirshfeld/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Max Hirshfeld/NPR
Bob Edwards was the host of Morning Edition from its 1979 inception until 2004.

Bob Edwards was the host of Morning Edition from its 1979 inception until 2004.

Max Hirshfeld/NPR

Celebrate With Morning Edition

This week, Morning Edition is celebrating 35 years online and on air. Join us using hashtag #MEbday35.

On this day in 1979, Morning Edition broadcast its first show, bringing a new style of storytelling to the early-drive-time airwaves.

That first show, hosted by Bob Edwards and Barbara Hoctor, included an interview with a young actor named Martin Sheen about Apocalypse Now; a report on a failed prison escape by James Earl Ray, the man who assassinated Martin Luther King Jr.; and a story about Rhodesia, a country that no longer exists. (You can view the first show's rundown of segments here.)

Over the next 35 years, Morning Edition would elevate itself to become public radio's top news program.

Memo from Larry Lichty, former NPR director of audience research and evaluation, seeking name suggestions for a new morning news program. i

Memo from Larry Lichty, former NPR director of audience research and evaluation, seeking name suggestions for a new morning news program. NPR hide caption

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Memo from Larry Lichty, former NPR director of audience research and evaluation, seeking name suggestions for a new morning news program.

Memo from Larry Lichty, former NPR director of audience research and evaluation, seeking name suggestions for a new morning news program.

NPR
Correction Nov. 5, 2014

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly identified Barbara Hoctor as Barbara Hunter.

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