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Die-Hard Users Are Still Dialing Up The Internet On AOL
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Die-Hard Users Are Still Dialing Up The Internet On AOL

Digital Life

Die-Hard Users Are Still Dialing Up The Internet On AOL

Die-Hard Users Are Still Dialing Up The Internet On AOL
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Despite broadband, AOL is still going strong. Around 2 million people still subscribe to the company's dial-up service, ringing in the '90s one modem at a time.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

OK, do you hear that?

(SOUNDBITE OF DIAL UP INTERNET)

MARTIN: Because for a lot of people, that is the sound of the past. Those early days of the Internet, nay, the World Wide Web where AOL dial up reigned supreme. Turns out AOL's dial up service is still alive and kicking with 2.2 million subscribers holding on. And really, who can blame them? After all, it's the sound of anticipation.

(SOUNDBITE OF DIAL UP INTERNET)

COMPUTERIZED VOICE: You've got mail.

MARTIN: Honestly, can broadband really compete with that?

UNIDENTIFIED GIRLS: Surfs up, see you on the net.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: On your mark, get set.

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