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Bob Dylan's 'Basement Tapes' Formed A Legend
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Bob Dylan's 'Basement Tapes' Formed A Legend

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Bob Dylan's 'Basement Tapes' Formed A Legend

Bob Dylan's 'Basement Tapes' Formed A Legend
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Bob Dylan's career was interrupted in 1966 when he crashed his motorcycle while riding near his home in upstate New York. He wasn't badly injured, but used the occasion to disengage from the grind of touring he'd been doing, relax, and hang out with his band. During this hiatus, some tapes surfaced of new songs he'd been writing: the infamous Basement Tapes. On the occasion of the entire archive being released, Fresh Air critic Ed Ward takes a look at them.

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