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Neil, Gamin': The Author Is Quizzed On Gilbert & Sullivan

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Neil, Gamin': The Author Is Quizzed On Gilbert & Sullivan

Neil, Gamin': The Author Is Quizzed On Gilbert & Sullivan

Neil, Gamin': The Author Is Quizzed On Gilbert & Sullivan

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/363546485/363580355" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Gaiman offered "Bee Dangerous" honey, made from his very own bees, as the grand prize. NPR hide caption

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When he was nine years old, author Neil Gaiman won a newspaper contest about Gilbert & Sullivan, the Victorian-era composers known for advanced, often over-the-top wordplay in operas like The Mikado, H.M.S. Pinafore and Pirates of Penzance. One listen to the "Major-General's Song" (which would later become the basis for one of our favorite Tom Lehrer songs) and it's clear these songs are not for the faint-of-tongue. See how much Gaiman remembers about the duo's 19th century operettas...and whether he can sing his answers.

Plus, Gaiman advises that everyone should have a hobby that could potentially kill them (his is beekeeping), and lends his voice to an extra-creepy rendition of Jonathan Coulton's "Creepy Doll."

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