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Why Do We Undervalue Introverts?

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Why Do We Undervalue Introverts?

Why Do We Undervalue Introverts?

Why Do We Undervalue Introverts?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/364148816/365506400" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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More From This Episode

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Quiet.

About Susan Cain's TED Talk

In a culture where being social and outgoing are celebrated, it can be difficult to be an introvert. Susan Cain argues introverts bring extraordinary talents to the world, and should be celebrated.

About Susan Cain

Susan Cain is a former corporate lawyer and negotiations consultant — and a self-proclaimed introvert. In her book Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, Cain notes that although our culture undervalues them dramatically, introverts have made some of the great contributions to society. Based on research and interviews, she argues that we design our schools and workplaces for extroverts, and that this bias creates a waste of talent, energy and happiness.

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