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Campaign Rallies Resume In Liberia, Raising Uncertainty Over Ebola Risk
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Campaign Rallies Resume In Liberia, Raising Uncertainty Over Ebola Risk

Global Health

Campaign Rallies Resume In Liberia, Raising Uncertainty Over Ebola Risk

Campaign Rallies Resume In Liberia, Raising Uncertainty Over Ebola Risk
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/367596302/367600024" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Supporters of the Congress for Democratic Change party take part in a meeting in Monorovia on Nov. 20 for the opening of political campaign activities for senatorial elections. Elections are due to take place on Dec. 16, after being suspended because of the Ebola epidemic. i

Supporters of the Congress for Democratic Change party take part in a meeting in Monorovia on Nov. 20 for the opening of political campaign activities for senatorial elections. Elections are due to take place on Dec. 16, after being suspended because of the Ebola epidemic. Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images
Supporters of the Congress for Democratic Change party take part in a meeting in Monorovia on Nov. 20 for the opening of political campaign activities for senatorial elections. Elections are due to take place on Dec. 16, after being suspended because of the Ebola epidemic.

Supporters of the Congress for Democratic Change party take part in a meeting in Monorovia on Nov. 20 for the opening of political campaign activities for senatorial elections. Elections are due to take place on Dec. 16, after being suspended because of the Ebola epidemic.

Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images

In Liberia, the number of new cases of Ebola is going down, but the risk has not been eliminated. To help contain the disease, schools are set to be closed until March.

But a national Senate election, which was postponed once, is now set for mid-December. That means campaigning — which means crowds.

Back in August and September, when a hundred people were getting Ebola a day, Monrovia was a ghost town. Ebola treatment units were full and regular hospitals were closed. Some people died in the streets. A lot of people stayed home.

Now, hundreds of people are heading out to those big campaign rallies. For the first time in a long time, there's a reason to party in Monrovia.

Still, many people are hanging back, and say they're trying to follow the rules in the time of Ebola: Keep your distance; no touching.

Ophelia Gaga says Ebola is all her family talks about, especially how and when to wash your hands in chlorinated water, which kills Ebola.

"Before in the bathroom, you wash your hands, before eating you wash your hands," she says. "Everything concerning me, I wash my hands day and night."

Washing your hands, day and night; Gaga says she's sick of washing hands. She says she's happy to just relax and dance.

Munah Krah is dancing, too. She is a member of the opposition party, which is sponsoring the event. She says she is not afraid of Ebola.

"Because I know I am protected by God," she says.

Krah believes even if she weren't washing her hands, she'd still have divine protection — but, at the same time, she is washing her hands.

While those on the periphery seem cautious, looking deeper into the crowd, you see people flirting, hugging and touching. You also start to hear a lot of different theories about Ebola.

Some people say the fact that they're even having elections means Ebola is gone.

"If they ... knew that Ebola was still in this country, I believe that no one gonna have elections in Liberia," says Marcy Taylor.

The government closed schools and markets and said no public gatherings. But now they're allowing public gatherings for elections, so some say that must mean Ebola is gone.

A government spokesman did not return calls to talk about this change of policy.

One thing that is known is that postponing the election any further would go against the constitution. Journalists here say no party wants to be criticized for doing that.

Walter Cole, who just graduated high school, says he follows the news that Ebola treatment units, or ETUs, are still being built around Liberia.

"I still believe that Ebola is still in Liberia," Cole says. "Because if there was no Ebola in Liberia, they would not be building ETUs all around town."

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf says she's hoping for no new Ebola cases by Christmas — but many health officials say the president's goal is too optimistic.

Cole, for his part, says he had hoped to go to trade school this fall. But now he's just sitting at home, waiting for schools to open again.

In the meantime, the election parties are getting bigger every day.

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